All posts tagged: Bonn

Rich Countries Say They Won’t Pay to Compensate for Weather-caused Damage

The world’s rich countries, including those in the European Union and Australia, say they strongly disagree with a proposal to include financing the impact of weather-caused disasters in Loss and Damage” negotiations in the United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Bonn. “We have to prioritize disaster, but not all disasters are fed by climate change,” said Australian negotiators in a prepared statement at the 23rd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 23) to the UN Convention on Climate Change, a follow-on to the pathbreaking Paris Agreement on climate change in October 2016. Loss and Damage, a term used frequently in the negotiations especially by developing and least developed countries, refers to permanent losses such as lives, species, and habitat and repairable damages such as roads and other infrastructures caused by the impact of climate change impact. These are losses and damages that cannot be addressed by adaptation. Two important discussions surrounding loss and damage are the concept of Common But Differentiated Responsibilities (CBDR) and compensation (finance). CBDR is a principle of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that …

What are young people doing at COP?

Today, we celebrate Young Feminist Day and Youth and Future Generations Day and here we feature some of the young people here at COP 23 and the work they do. They also talk about why engaging the youth in the policy process is important. Watch the videos below and get to know them more:

World Moves Forward on Climate Change Without US

The latest united Nations conference on Climate Change – the aftermath of the groundbreaking climate agreement signed in Paris prior to the election of President Donald Trump – got underway on Nov. 7 without the United States and immediately found Nicaragua and Syria committing to global climate action, isolating the US further. In a striking riposte to Trump, the US even found itself isolated its own major local governments including California, Oregon and Washington as well as other governments and businesses. In addition in seeming opposition to the administration the White House itself signed off on a statement by 13 federal agencies on Nov. 3 that climate change is real, caused by human activity and responsible for major damage to the environment. Nicaragua, which decided in 2015 that it wouldn’t sign the Paris Agreement over what it said was a lack of commitment to cutting greenhouse gases, announced on Oct. 23 that it has decided to join. “It is the only instrument we have in the world that allows the unity of intentions and efforts …

Who gets to influence the climate negotiations?

co-written with Anna Perez Catala and Pavlos Georgiadis A number of developing countries, led by Ecuador, Guatemala and Bolivia are now calling for concrete measures to define how the public policy making process interacts with the private sector in climate change negotiations. What they want is special attention to be given to concerns over potential conflicts of interest between the industry and the implementation of the Paris Agreement. Many business communities and the media too are actively engaged with climate change issues all over the world. Having their views heard and considered by negotiating Parties is not necessarily a bad thing. However, concerns are being voiced about the undue influence of the fossil fuel lobby, which yet has to prove whether it is willing to align its polluting business models with the agreed goal of keeping global warming below 1.5°C. According to Jesse Bragg of Corporate Accountability International, (CAI) one of the key concerns is that there is already a welcoming place for groups and corporations representing the fossil fuel industry, but that the Paris Agreement …